News

2013.06.28 | Arctic Research Centre, Environment, climate and energy

Kronprinsen tager første spadestik til ny stor forskningssatsning i Arktis

2013.06.21 | Arctic Research Centre, Environment, climate and energy

Kronprinsen indvier nye forskningsstationer i Nordøstgrønland

HKH Kronprins Frederik medvirker i den delegation, som nu drager til Nordøstgrønland for at indvie nye forskningsstationer.

Ice algae. Photo: Maria Stenzel

2013.06.18 | Arctic Research Centre, Environment, climate and energy

New research project: Sea ice ecosystems: Ecological effects of a thinning snow cover

This project looks at microscopic algae that live in sea ice, which are important contributors to food webs in the Arctic.

Arctic charr prefers cold lakes and rivers with oxygen-rich water. Whether it may adapt to a warmer climate in Greenland is the question behind a new research project. Photo: Michael M. Hansen.

2013.06.10 | Arctic Research Centre, Environment, climate and energy

GENETICISTS TO INVESTIGATE TWO IMPORTANT SPECIES OF FRESHWATER FISH

Can Arctic charr and stickleback adapt to the climate changes in Greenland through evolution? This is the question behind a new research project managed by the Department of Bioscience.

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2013.06.06 | Public/media, Arctic Research Centre

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2013.06.04 | Arctic Research Centre, Environment, climate and energy

Foruroligende ny viden om klimaændringer i Arktis

Den første tydelige sammenhæng mellem insektbestande og temperaturstigninger i Arktis er nu kortlagt af danske forskere. Professor kalder opdagelsen ’foruroligende’.

2013.06.04 | Arctic Research Centre, Environment, climate and energy

Trækkende havkrydser følges af chip

Den lille kjove flyver hvert år hele vejen fra den ene ende af jordkloden til den anden – og så tilbage igen. Arktiske fugles meget lange trækruter kan nu kortlægges ved at »ringmærke« dem med en lille chip, der sladrer om fuglens flugt.

Flowers and insects are mutually dependent on each other. Changes in flowering periods now mean fewer insects in the Arctic. (Photo: Toke Thomas Høye)

2013.06.03 | Arctic Research Centre, Environment, climate and energy

CLIMATE CHANGES TO BLAME FOR FEWER INSECTS IN THE ARCTIC

The warmer climate in the Arctic has resulted in plants flowering earlier than previously and for a shorter period of time overall. This has caused a shift in the period when insect pollinators are present. Aarhus University researchers can now demonstrate that this development means that the number of some species of insect pollinators has been…

Photo: Peter Bondo Christensen

2013.06.03 | Arctic Research Centre, Environment, climate and energy

Basic oases in an acidified ocean

A new research project with the Arctic Research Centre investigates whether arctic seaweed forests may act as oases for animals with calcareous shells, animals that are challenged by the climate change induced acidification of the world’s seas.